Posts Tagged ‘Senior Transportation’

Everyday Heroes

July 17, 2017

ITNAmerica founder and executive director Katherine Freund was featured on everydayheroesproject.com, a multimedia project that tells the stories of ordinary people transforming their communities.

From the Everyday Heroes website: “These unsung heroes work on the ground to raise their neighbors out of poverty and help the needy when public institutions fail. We share their stories in hopes that you too will hear the call to action and help those who need it most.”

That’s exactly what ITNAmerica does, and what Katherine has spent decades doing — working to support our neighbors. In ITNAmerica‘s case, it’s our older neighbors we’re focusing on, making sure they have access to safe, reliable transportation. Because mobility is part of a healthy fulfilling life.

We’re excited to see Katherine recognized as an everyday hero. Read the full story here.

Flashback, Phil Bowhay: Going my way?

April 17, 2017

One of the better things about not driving anymore — seriously mature, visually impaired, among other things — is the people you meet. Those behind the wheel that pick you up, drive you around and bring you home again, or to hither and yon, your choice. I tell you this as a public service. Sure, there are friends and relatives who are happy to give a ride, but now and then, well, you know the rest.

Of course, if you live in the center of Pacific Grove, it’s an easy walk or stroll to Grove Market, Fandango or any number of fine establishments. On the other hand, if you want to visit Ryan Ranch, Monterey, Carmel, the airport or places in between and beyond, better to pay a little, with no strings attached. All of this takes me back to the good old days when we hitchhiked. Lots of stories there, but later.

Read the full article online here

Lexington Herald Leader: It’s like Uber for seniors — complete with ‘arm-through-arm’ walk to the door

December 11, 2016

ITNBluegrass Executive Director Laura Dake stands with rider Jack Carty. Carty, 88, works five to six days a week and gets rides from ITNBluegrass to get there. Photo provided BY TOM MARTIN

Laura Dake is executive director of ITN or Independent Transportation Network-Bluegrass. Due to a recent injury that left me temporarily unable to drive, I turned to ITN for transportation around Lexington and quickly discovered what an important difference this nonprofit is making in so many lives in the Bluegrass area. So, I invited Laura to share information about her organization.

Q: First, a brief history on the origins of ITN-Buegrass.

A: About 10 years ago or so, ITN-America decided to launch its model nationwide. In 2007, a lady named Gale Reece had recently retired and was looking for a project in the local community that had something to do with aging. She was particularly interested in housing, but went to the city of Lexington and was told that the real issue in this area was transportation — that people couldn’t really live in their homes without the transportation to get places. They found that ITN-America had started to launch their model nationwide, submitted an application to ITN-America, and it was accepted. I came onboard as a fundraiser because the requirement was that the affiliate needed to raise about $125,000 in order to start.

 Read the full article online here

ITNMontereyCounty was honored to be interviewed on Brickman Banter

October 6, 2016

ITNMontereyCounty was honored to be interviewed on Brickman Banter. To reach the ITNMontereyCounty portion of the interview please begin about 30 minutes in.

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The Californian: Nonprofit provides rides for seniors

August 22, 2016
Doris Beach, left, celebrates the (ITN) Independent Transportation Network/Monterey County by taking the 25,000th ride.

Doris Beach, left, celebrates the (ITN) Independent Transportation Network/Monterey County by taking the 25,000th ride. Executive Director of ITN in Monterey County Aimee Cuda stands with her. (Photo: Laureen Diephof/For The Salinas Californian)

Transportation is a key ingredient to help insure that Monterey County senior citizens maintain their independence. On Aug.5, BMW Manager Paul Giovino hosted the 25,000th ride of ITN Monterey with Executive Director of ITN Aimee Cuda at his dealership in the Seaside Auto Mall.

Independent Transportation Network/Monterey County (ITN) strives to meet the Monterey County seniors’ needs and those efforts were celebrated on Aug. 5 at the BMW Seaside location. BMW Manager Paul Giovino provided the space to hold the celebration.

In the tradition and the requirement of ITN’s program, Beach was picked up at her door and taken to the door of her destination, Seaside.

Read the full article online here

ITNLehighValley’s Lois Favier on Take Charge of Your Life

July 4, 2016

Lois Favier, Executive Director of ITNLehighValley – Independent Transportation Network, joins host Eleanor Bobrow to discuss providing transportation services to seniors and the visually impaired. This important service helps them maintain their independence.

Listen Now

Age-Friendly Maine News: ITNCountry and Age Friendly Communities in Maine

June 15, 2016

ITNCountry and Age Friendly Communities in MaineFor more than 20 years, the Independent Transportation Network has provided door-through-door and arm-through-arm transportation for older people and people with visual impairments in the Greater Portland area. Using both paid and volunteer drivers, ITN provides rides 24/7 in private automobiles, and it is does not rely on taxpayer dollars. Some ITN members have used the service from more than 18 years. Although 40 percent of rides are for healthcare, ITN takes people to work, to shopping and to the hairdresser. Members even use the service to take pets to the veterinarian or to go on dates.

Maine has almost 500 municipalities, so over the years, many communities have reached out to ITN to expand service to their older or visually impaired residents. Until now, ITN always had to say “sorry.” Now there may be a way to offer ITN’s innovative programs to communities of every size, in Maine and other states.

The new approach is called ITNCountry and ITN’s founder, Katherine Freund, is already working with several small and rural communities in Maine, as well as one each in Pennsylvania, Vermont and Arizona, to develop the new rural model.

There are several proposed differences between the original ITN and the rural model. The original is an entirely separate non-profit organization, but ITNCountry can be a program within another organization. The original ITN guarantees a ride 24/7 for any purpose, while ITNCountry service parameters will be established by the local communities. Because it is practically impossible to guarantee a ride 24/7 with no paid staff, the original ITN has both paid and volunteer drivers and staff. But small, rural communities often run on little or no paid staff, so ITNCountry will be designed to run with only volunteers, if that is what the community chooses to do. Another proposed difference will be how ITNCountry communities learn how to run the service. ITN will build a large on-line learning community where all of ITN’s innovative programs are taught and supported.

With all of these differences, what is proposed to stay the same? The important stuff—all of ITN’s award winning programs, like CarTrade, Transportation Social Security, Ride & Shop, Healthy Miles, Ride Services, and Personal Transportation Accounts. In these programs, older people may trade the cars they can no longer drive to cover the cost of their rides, or volunteers may earn credits for their volunteer effort and bank them to plan for their own future needs. An adult child may volunteer in Bowdoinham and send her volunteer credits to a parent who lives in Bethel, where an ITNCountry volunteer will drive her mother, father or grandparent. Merchants and healthcare providers can help pay for rides through Ride & Shop or Healthy Miles and everything, all of these programs, are built into the software. Best of all, the software will connect every participating community through one information system, across the State of Maine.

If you or your community would like to learn more or participate in ITNCountry, please contact Katherine at Katherine.Freund@ITNAmerica.org or call 207-591-6926.

Katherine Freund, ITNAmerica Founder and President Assembles An Expert Panel for Game Changing Dialogue- Senior Mobility in Transit: Nothing Will Ever Be the Same Again.

January 7, 2016

Monday, January 11th from 10:15AM-12:00PM Katherine Freud will lead a discussion panel during the 95th annual Transportation Research Board Meeting in Washington, DC. The panel of experts will explore the impact of connectivity as a game changer for increasing mobility options for Seniors on a National and International basis. Experts from Uber, Lyft, AARP Life Reimagined and Princeton University will discuss new collaborations, changing expectations, special needs, smart cars and a rapidly changing landscape in senior transportation.

To view the full program scheduled, go to the interactive Transportation Research Board 95th Annual Program Guide

CapeGazette.com: Senior transportation co-op is on the road

December 14, 2015
Thanks to volunteer driver Cathy Taylor, ITN Southern Delaware's first official ride went off without a hitch.

Shown are ITN Southern Delaware co-op member Jack Refsnider, left, and volunteer driver Catherine Taylor.

Thanks to volunteer driver Cathy Taylor, ITN Southern Delaware’s first official ride went off without a hitch.

Taylor picked up Jack Refsnider at his Rehoboth home for a scheduled appointment Dec. 2. She also volunteered to bring him back home.

Taylor said, “Jack loves American history, so an interesting conversation was had!” Refsnider said next time he needs a ride, he hopes Taylor will be his driver. She assured him that all the volunteers are wonderful people, but if she is available she would love to drive him again.

Read the full article online here.

Social Work Faculty and Sanders Brown Collaborate on Aging Research

April 26, 2013

“I lived next to the campus and a grocery, so I thought a car was unnecessary but I was wrong. I was imprisoned in my tiny studio apartment and felt like I was disabled. I had to ask friends for a ride when I wanted to go somewhere. As a person who highly values independence, I felt shamed when I asked for a ride from others. So, unlike my plan of living without a car for the first year of my doctorate program, I bought a car right after my first three months in Cleveland. This intense experience living without a car made me think about what the process of being disabled is like, and the role of independent transportation, impact of life space constriction on the quality of life at old age.”

Read the full article online here